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dc.contributor.authorFransen, M
dc.contributor.authorBridgett, L
dc.contributor.authorMarch, L
dc.contributor.authorHoy, D
dc.contributor.authorPenserga, E
dc.contributor.authorBrooks, P
dc.date.available2014-05-21T22:20:44Z
dc.date.issued2011-05-01
dc.identifierhttp://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000289901600002&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=d4d813f4571fa7d6246bdc0dfeca3a1c
dc.identifier.citationFransen, M., Bridgett, L., March, L., Hoy, D., Penserga, E. & Brooks, P. (2011). The epidemiology of osteoarthritis in Asia. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF RHEUMATIC DISEASES, 14 (2), pp.113-121. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1756-185X.2011.01608.x.
dc.identifier.issn1756-1841
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/28976
dc.descriptionC1 - Journal Articles Refereed
dc.description.abstractWorldwide, osteoarthritis (OA) is estimated to be the fourth leading cause of disability. Most of this disability burden is attributable to the involvement of the hips or the knees. OA is strongly associated with ageing and the Asian region is ageing rapidly. Further, OA has been associated with heavy physical occupational activity, a required livelihood for many people living in rural communities in developing countries. Unfortunately, joint replacement surgery, an effective intervention for people with severe OA involving the hips or knees, is inaccessible to most people in these regions. On the other hand, obesity, another major risk factor, may be less prevalent, although it is on the increase. Determining region-specific OA prevalence and risk factor profiles will provide important information for planning future cost-effective preventive strategies and health care services. An update of what is currently known about the prevalence of hip and knee OA from population-based studies conducted in the Asian region is presented in this review. Many of the recent studies have conducted comparisons between urban and rural areas and poor and affluent communities. The results of Asian-based studies evaluating risk factors from population-based cohorts or case-control studies, and the current evidence on OA morbidity burden in Asia is also outlined.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherWILEY
dc.subjectRheumatology and Arthritis; Epidemiology; Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified; Skeletal System and Disorders (incl. Arthritis); Health Inequalities; Disability and Functional Capacity; Health Related to Ageing; Specific Population Health (excl. Indigenous Health) not elsewhere classified
dc.titleThe epidemiology of osteoarthritis in Asia
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1756-185X.2011.01608.x
melbourne.peerreviewPeer Reviewed
melbourne.affiliationThe University of Melbourne
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMedicine, Dentistry And Health Sciences
melbourne.source.titleINTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF RHEUMATIC DISEASES
melbourne.source.volume14
melbourne.source.issue2
melbourne.source.pages113-121
dc.research.codefor110322
dc.research.codefor111706
dc.research.codefor111799
dc.research.codeseo2008920116
dc.research.codeseo2008920206
dc.research.codeseo2008920403
dc.research.codeseo2008920502
dc.research.codeseo2008920599
melbourne.publicationid160996
melbourne.elementsid333243
melbourne.contributor.authorBrooks, Peter
dc.identifier.eissn1756-185X
melbourne.conference.locationEngland
melbourne.accessrightsThis item is currently not available from this repository


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