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dc.contributor.authorCarrol, ED
dc.contributor.authorMankhambo, LA
dc.contributor.authorGuiver, M
dc.contributor.authorBanda, DL
dc.contributor.authorDenis, B
dc.contributor.authorDove, W
dc.contributor.authorJeffers, G
dc.contributor.authorMolyneux, EM
dc.contributor.authorMolyneux, ME
dc.contributor.authorHart, CA
dc.contributor.authorGraham, SM
dc.date.available2014-05-21T22:29:06Z
dc.date.available2011-05-17
dc.date.available2011-05-17
dc.date.issued2011-06-14
dc.identifierpii: PONE-D-11-05469
dc.identifier.citationCarrol, E. D., Mankhambo, L. A., Guiver, M., Banda, D. L., Denis, B., Dove, W., Jeffers, G., Molyneux, E. M., Molyneux, M. E., Hart, C. A. & Graham, S. M. (2011). PCR Improves Diagnostic Yield from Lung Aspiration in Malawian Children with Radiologically Confirmed Pneumonia. PLOS ONE, 6 (6), https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0021042.
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/29066
dc.descriptionC1 - Journal Articles Refereed
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Accurate data on childhood pneumonia aetiology are essential especially from regions where mortality is high, in order to inform case-management guidelines and the potential of prevention strategies such as bacterial conjugate vaccines. Yield from blood culture is low, but lung aspirate culture provides a higher diagnostic yield. We aimed to determine if diagnostic yield could be increased further by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection of bacteria (Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae b) and viruses in lung aspirate fluid. METHODS: A total of 95 children with radiological focal, lobar or segmental consolidation had lung aspirate performed and sent for bacterial culture and for PCR for detection of bacteria, viruses and Pneumocystis jirovecii. In children with a pneumococcal aetiology, pneumococcal bacterial loads were calculated in blood and lung aspirate fluid. RESULTS: Blood culture identified a bacterial pathogen in only 8 patients (8%). With the addition of PCR on lung aspirate samples, causative pathogens (bacterial, viral, pneumocystis) were identified singly or as co-infections in 59 children (62%). The commonest bacterial organism was S.pneumoniae (41%), followed by H. influenzae b (6%), and the commonest virus identified was adenovirus (16%), followed by human bocavirus (HBoV) (4%), either as single or co-infection. CONCLUSIONS: In a select group of African children, lung aspirate PCR significantly improves diagnostic yield. Our study confirms a major role of S.pneumoniae and viruses in the aetiology of childhood pneumonia in Africa.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherPUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.subjectInfectious Diseases; Respiratory System and Diseases (incl. Asthma); Child Health
dc.titlePCR Improves Diagnostic Yield from Lung Aspiration in Malawian Children with Radiologically Confirmed Pneumonia
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0021042
melbourne.peerreviewPeer Reviewed
melbourne.affiliationThe University of Melbourne
melbourne.affiliation.departmentPaediatrics Royal Children'S Hospital
melbourne.source.titlePLoS One
melbourne.source.volume6
melbourne.source.issue6
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
melbourne.publicationid167912
melbourne.elementsid337556
melbourne.openaccess.pmchttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3114850
melbourne.contributor.authorGraham, Stephen
dc.identifier.eissn1932-6203
melbourne.fieldofresearch320211 Infectious diseases
melbourne.seocode200199 Clinical health not elsewhere classified
melbourne.seocode200506 Neonatal and child health
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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