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dc.contributor.authorKavanagh, AM
dc.contributor.authorGoller, JL
dc.contributor.authorKing, T
dc.contributor.authorJolley, D
dc.contributor.authorCrawford, D
dc.contributor.authorTurrell, G
dc.date.available2014-05-22T00:41:52Z
dc.date.issued2005-11-01
dc.identifierpii: 59/11/934
dc.identifier.citationKavanagh, A. M., Goller, J. L., King, T., Jolley, D., Crawford, D. & Turrell, G. (2005). Urban area disadvantage and physical activity: a multilevel study in Melbourne, Australia. JOURNAL OF EPIDEMIOLOGY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH, 59 (11), pp.934-940. https://doi.org/10.1136/jech.2005.035931.
dc.identifier.issn0143-005X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/30284
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: To estimate variation between small areas in the levels of walking, cycling, jogging, and swimming and overall physical activity and the importance of area level socioeconomic disadvantage in predicting physical activity participation. METHODS: All census collector districts (CCDs) in the 20 innermost local government areas in metropolitan Melbourne, Australia, were identified and ranked by the percentage of low income households (<400 dollars/week) living in the CCD. Fifty CCDs were randomly selected from the least, middle, and most disadvantaged septiles of the ranked CCDs and 2349 residents (58.7% participation rate) participated in a cross sectional postal survey about physical activity. Multilevel logistic regression (adjusted for extrabinomial variation) was used to estimate area level variation in walking, cycling, jogging, and swimming and in overall physical activity participation, and the importance of area level socioeconomic disadvantage in predicting physical activity participation. RESULTS: There were significant variations between CCDs in all activities and in overall physical participation in age and sex adjusted models; however, after adjustment for individual SES (income, occupation, education) and area level socioeconomic disadvantage, significant differences remained only for walking (p = 0.004), cycling (p = 0.003), and swimming (p = 0.024). Living in the most socioeconomically disadvantaged areas was associated with a decreased likelihood of jogging and of having overall physical activity levels that were sufficiently active for health; these effects remained after adjustment for individual socioeconomic status (sufficiently active: OR 0.70, 95% CI 0.55 to 0.90 and jogging: OR = 0.69, 95% CI 0.51 to 0.94). CONCLUSION: These research findings support the need to focus on improving local environments to increase physical activity participation.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherB M J PUBLISHING GROUP
dc.subjectHuman Geography
dc.titleUrban area disadvantage and physical activity: a multilevel study in Melbourne, Australia
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/jech.2005.035931
melbourne.peerreviewPeer Reviewed
melbourne.affiliationThe University of Melbourne
melbourne.affiliation.departmentPopulation Health
melbourne.source.titleJournal of Epidemiology and Community Health
melbourne.source.volume59
melbourne.source.issue11
melbourne.source.pages934-940
dc.description.pagestart934
melbourne.publicationid40267
melbourne.elementsid270554
melbourne.openaccess.pmchttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1732943
melbourne.contributor.authorKavanagh, Anne
melbourne.contributor.authorKing, Tania
melbourne.contributor.authorTurrell, Gavin
melbourne.contributor.authorGoller, Jane
dc.identifier.eissn1470-2738
melbourne.accessrightsAccess this item via the Open Access location


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