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dc.contributor.authorCrossley, TF
dc.contributor.authorHurley, J
dc.contributor.authorJeon, S-H
dc.date.available2014-05-22T00:55:01Z
dc.date.issued2009-04-01
dc.identifierhttp://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000264935800006&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=d4d813f4571fa7d6246bdc0dfeca3a1c
dc.identifier.citationCrossley, T. F., Hurley, J. & Jeon, S. -H. (2009). PHYSICIAN LABOUR SUPPLY IN CANADA: A COHORT ANALYSIS. HEALTH ECONOMICS, 18 (4), pp.437-456. https://doi.org/10.1002/hec.1378.
dc.identifier.issn1057-9230
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/30388
dc.description.abstractThis paper employs a cohort analysis to examine the relative importance of different factors in explaining changes in the number of hours spent in direct patient care by Canadian general/family practitioners (GPs) over the period 1982-2003. Cohorts are defined by year of graduation from medical school. The results for male GPs indicate that there is little age effect on hours of direct patient care, especially among physicians aged 35-55, there is no strong cohort effect on hours of direct patient care, but there is a secular decline in hours of direct patient care over the period. The results for female GPs indicate that female physicians on average work fewer hours than male physicians, there is a clear age effect on hours of direct patient care, there is no strong cohort effect, and there has been little secular change in average hours of direct patient care. The changing behaviour of male GPs accounted for a greater proportion of the overall decline in hours of direct patient care from the 1980s through the mid-1990 s than did the growing proportion of female GPs in the physician stock.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherWILEY
dc.subjectApplied Economics
dc.titlePHYSICIAN LABOUR SUPPLY IN CANADA: A COHORT ANALYSIS
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/hec.1378
melbourne.peerreviewPeer Reviewed
melbourne.affiliationThe University of Melbourne
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMelbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research
melbourne.source.titleHealth Economics
melbourne.source.volume18
melbourne.source.issue4
melbourne.source.pages437-456
dc.description.pagestart437
melbourne.publicationid136367
melbourne.elementsid277438
melbourne.contributor.authorJEON, SUNG-HEE
dc.identifier.eissn1099-1050
melbourne.accessrightsThis item is currently not available from this repository


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