Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorScott, A
dc.contributor.authorCoote, W
dc.date.available2014-05-22T01:01:57Z
dc.date.issued2010-06-01
dc.identifierhttp://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000278302400007&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=d4d813f4571fa7d6246bdc0dfeca3a1c
dc.identifier.citationScott, A. & Coote, W. (2010). DO REGIONAL PRIMARY-CARE ORGANISATIONS INFLUENCE PRIMARY-CARE PERFORMANCE? A DYNAMIC PANEL ESTIMATION. HEALTH ECONOMICS, 19 (6), pp.716-729. https://doi.org/10.1002/hec.1509.
dc.identifier.issn1057-9230
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/30444
dc.description.abstractThe role of regional primary-care organizations (PCOs) in health-care systems is not well understood. This is the first study to attempt to isolate the effect of regional PCOs on primary-care performance. We examine Divisions of General Practice in Australia, which were established in 1992. A unique Division-level panel data set is used to examine the effect of Divisions, and their activities, on various aspects of primary-care performance. Dynamic panel estimation is used to account for state dependence and the endogeneity of Divisions' activities. The results show that Divisions were more likely to have influenced general practice infrastructure than clinical performance in diabetes, asthma and cervical screening. The effect of specific Division activities, such as providing support for practice nurses and IT support, was not directly related to changes in the level of general practice performance. Specific support in the areas of diabetes and asthma was associated with general practice performance, but this was due to reverse causality and the effect of unobservable factors, rather than the direct effect of Divisions.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherWILEY
dc.subjectApplied Economics
dc.titleDO REGIONAL PRIMARY-CARE ORGANISATIONS INFLUENCE PRIMARY-CARE PERFORMANCE? A DYNAMIC PANEL ESTIMATION
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/hec.1509
melbourne.peerreviewPeer Reviewed
melbourne.affiliationThe University of Melbourne
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMelbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research
melbourne.source.titleHealth Economics
melbourne.source.volume19
melbourne.source.issue6
melbourne.source.pages716-729
dc.description.pagestart716
melbourne.publicationid154210
melbourne.elementsid328839
melbourne.contributor.authorScott, Anthony
dc.identifier.eissn1099-1050
melbourne.accessrightsThis item is currently not available from this repository


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record