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dc.contributor.authorMookherjee, N
dc.contributor.authorRapport, N
dc.contributor.authorJosephides, L
dc.contributor.authorHage, G
dc.contributor.authorTodd, LR
dc.contributor.authorCowlishaw, G
dc.date.available2014-05-22T01:16:33Z
dc.date.issued2009-09-01
dc.identifierhttp://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000269603800005&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=d4d813f4571fa7d6246bdc0dfeca3a1c
dc.identifier.citationMookherjee, N., Rapport, N., Josephides, L., Hage, G., Todd, L. R. & Cowlishaw, G. (2009). The Ethics of Apology A Set of Commentaries. CRITIQUE OF ANTHROPOLOGY, 29 (3), pp.345-366. https://doi.org/10.1177/0308275X09336703.
dc.identifier.issn0308-275X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/30556
dc.description.abstract■ On 13 February 2008, the Australian government apologized to the ‘stolen generations’: those children of Aboriginal descent who were removed from their parents (usually their Aboriginal mothers) to be raised in white foster-homes and institutions administered by government and Christian churches — a practice that lasted from before the First World War to the early 1970s. This apology was significant, in the words of Rudd, for the ‘healing’ of the Australian nation. Apologizing for past injustices has become a significant speech act in current times. Why does saying sorry seem to be ubiquitous at the moment? What are the instances of not saying sorry? What are the ethical implications of this era of remembrance and apology? This set of commentaries seeks to explore some of the ethical, philosophical, social and political dimensions of this Age of Apology. The authors discuss whether apology is a responsibility which cannot — and should not — be avoided; the ethical pitfalls of seeking an apology, or not uttering it; the global and local understandings of apology and forgiveness; and the processes of ownership and appropriation in saying sorry.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherSAGE PUBLICATIONS LTD
dc.subjectAnthropology
dc.titleThe Ethics of Apology A Set of Commentaries
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0308275X09336703
melbourne.peerreviewPeer Reviewed
melbourne.affiliationThe University of Melbourne
melbourne.affiliation.departmentPhilosophy, Anthropology and Social Inquiry
melbourne.source.titleCritique of Anthropology
melbourne.source.volume29
melbourne.source.issue3
melbourne.source.pages345-366
dc.description.pagestart345
melbourne.publicationid133162
melbourne.elementsid315208
melbourne.contributor.authorHage, Ghassan
melbourne.internal.ingestnoteAbstract bulk upload (2017-07-24)
dc.identifier.eissn1460-3721
melbourne.accessrightsThis item is currently not available from this repository


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