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dc.contributor.authorJohnston, DW
dc.contributor.authorNicholls, MER
dc.contributor.authorShah, M
dc.contributor.authorShields, MA
dc.date.available2014-05-22T03:02:47Z
dc.date.issued2009-05-01
dc.identifierhttp://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000268057900004&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=d4d813f4571fa7d6246bdc0dfeca3a1c
dc.identifier.citationJohnston, D. W., Nicholls, M. E. R., Shah, M. & Shields, M. A. (2009). NATURE'S EXPERIMENT? HANDEDNESS AND EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT. DEMOGRAPHY, 46 (2), pp.281-301. https://doi.org/10.1353/dem.0.0053.
dc.identifier.issn0070-3370
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/31308
dc.description.abstractIn recent years, a large body of research has investigated the various factors affecting child development and the consequent impact of child development on future educational and labor market outcomes. In this article, we contribute to this literature by investigating the effect of handedness on child development. This is an important issue given that around 10% of the world's population is left-handed and given recent research demonstrating that child development strongly affects adult outcomes. Using a large, nationally representative sample of young children, we find that the probability of a child being left-handed is not significantly related to child health at birth, family composition, parental employment, or household income. We also find robust evidence that left-handed (and mixed-handed) children perform significantly worse in nearly all measures of development than right-handed children, with the relative disadvantage being larger for boys than girls. Importantly, these differentials cannot be explained by different socioeconomic characteristics of the household, parental attitudes, or investments in learning resources.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherSPRINGER
dc.subjectDemography
dc.titleNATURE'S EXPERIMENT? HANDEDNESS AND EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1353/dem.0.0053
melbourne.peerreviewPeer Reviewed
melbourne.affiliationThe University of Melbourne
melbourne.affiliation.departmentPsychological Sciences Academic Centre
melbourne.source.titleDEMOGRAPHY
melbourne.source.volume46
melbourne.source.issue2
melbourne.source.pages281-301
dc.description.pagestart281
melbourne.publicationid138682
melbourne.elementsid318861
melbourne.openaccess.pmchttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2831280
melbourne.contributor.authorNicholls, Michael
melbourne.contributor.authorSHAH, MANISHA
melbourne.contributor.authorShields, Michael
dc.identifier.eissn1533-7790
melbourne.accessrightsAccess this item via the Open Access location


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