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dc.contributor.authorGallant, Ailie J. E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKaroly, David J.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-22T07:03:34Z
dc.date.available2014-05-22T07:03:34Z
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationGallant, Ailie J. E., & Karoly, David J. (2010). A combined climate extremes index for the Australian Region. Journal of Climate, 23, 6153-6165, doi: 10.1175/2010JCLI3791.1.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0894-8755en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/32784
dc.description© Copyright 2010 American Meteorological Society (AMS). Permission to use figures, tables, and brief excerpts from this work in scientific and educational works is hereby granted provided that the source is acknowledged. Any use of material in this work that is determined to be “fair use” under Section 107 of the U.S. Copyright Act or that satisfies the conditions specified in Section 108 of the U.S. Copyright Act (17 USC §108, as revised by P.L. 94-553) does not require the AMS’s permission. Republication, systematic reproduction, posting in electronic form, such as on a web site or in a searchable database, or other uses of this material, except as exempted by the above statement, requires written permission or a license from the AMS. Additional details are provided in the AMS Copyright Policy, available on the AMS Web site located at (http://www.ametsoc.org/) or from the AMS at 617-227-2425 or copyrights@ametsoc.org.en_US
dc.description.abstractChanges in the area of Australia experiencing concurrent temperature and rainfall extremes are investigated through the use of two combined indices. The indices describe variations between the fraction of land area experiencing extreme cold and dry or hot and wet conditions. There is a high level of agreement between the variations and trends of the indices from 1957 to 2008 when computed using (i) a spatially complete gridded dataset without rigorous quality control checks and (ii) spatially incomplete high-quality station datasets with rigorous quality control checks. Australian extremes are examined starting from 1911, which is the first time a broad-scale assessment of Australian temperature extremes has been performed prior to 1957. Over the whole country, the results show an increase in the extent of hot and wet extremes and a decrease in the extent of cold and dry extremes annually and during all seasons from 1911 to 2008 at a rate of between 1% and 2% decade−1. These trends mostly stem from changes in tropical regions during summer and spring. There are relationships between the extent of extreme maximum temperatures, precipitation, and soil moisture on interannual and decadal time scales that are similar to the relationships exhibited by variations of the means. However, the trends from 1911 to 2008 and from 1957 to 2008 are not consistent with these relationships, providing evidence that the processes causing the interannual variations and those causing the longer-term trends are different.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Meteorological Societyen_US
dc.subjectAustraliaen_US
dc.subjectextreme eventsen_US
dc.subjectinterannual variabilityen_US
dc.subjectsoil moistureen_US
dc.subjecttime seriesen_US
dc.subjectrainfallen_US
dc.subjecttemperatureen_US
dc.titleA combined climate extremes index for the Australian Regionen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
melbourne.peerreviewPeer Revieweden_US
melbourne.affiliationThe University of Melbourneen_US
melbourne.affiliation.departmentScience - Earth Sciencesen_US
melbourne.publication.statusPublisheden_US
melbourne.source.titleJournal of Climateen_US
melbourne.source.volume23en_US
melbourne.source.pages6153-6165en_US
melbourne.elementsidNA
melbourne.contributor.authorGALLANT, AILIE
melbourne.contributor.authorKaroly, David
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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