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dc.contributor.authorNeedham, K
dc.contributor.authorMinter, RL
dc.contributor.authorShepherd, RK
dc.contributor.authorNayagam, BA
dc.date.available2014-05-22T07:23:00Z
dc.date.issued2013-01-01
dc.identifierhttp://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000312219700008&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=d4d813f4571fa7d6246bdc0dfeca3a1c
dc.identifier.citationNeedham, K., Minter, R. L., Shepherd, R. K. & Nayagam, B. A. (2013). Challenges for stem cells to functionally repair the damaged auditory nerve. EXPERT OPINION ON BIOLOGICAL THERAPY, 13 (1), pp.85-101. https://doi.org/10.1517/14712598.2013.728583.
dc.identifier.issn1471-2598
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/32891
dc.descriptionC1 - Journal Articles Refereed
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION: In the auditory system, a specialized subset of sensory neurons are responsible for correctly relaying precise pitch and temporal cues to the brain. In individuals with severe-to-profound sensorineural hearing impairment these sensory auditory neurons can be directly stimulated by a cochlear implant, which restores sound input to the brainstem after the loss of hair cells. This neural prosthesis therefore depends on a residual population of functional neurons in order to function effectively. AREAS COVERED: In severe cases of sensorineural hearing loss where the numbers of auditory neurons are significantly depleted, the benefits derived from a cochlear implant may be minimal. One way in which to restore function to the auditory nerve is to replace these lost neurons using differentiated stem cells, thus re-establishing the neural circuit required for cochlear implant function. Such a therapy relies on producing an appropriate population of electrophysiologically functional neurons from stem cells, and on these cells integrating and reconnecting in an appropriate manner in the deaf cochlea. EXPERT OPINION: Here we review progress in the field to date, including some of the key functional features that stem cell-derived neurons would need to possess and how these might be enhanced using electrical stimulation from a cochlear implant.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherTAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD
dc.subjectSensory Systems; Hearing
dc.subjectVision
dc.subjectSpeech and Their Disorders
dc.titleChallenges for stem cells to functionally repair the damaged auditory nerve
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1517/14712598.2013.728583
melbourne.peerreviewPeer Reviewed
melbourne.affiliationThe University of Melbourne
melbourne.affiliation.departmentOtolaryngology
melbourne.source.titleExpert Opinion on Biological Therapy
melbourne.source.volume13
melbourne.source.issue1
melbourne.source.pages85-101
melbourne.publicationid191963
melbourne.elementsid374452
melbourne.openaccess.pmchttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3543850
melbourne.contributor.authorNayagam, Bryony
melbourne.contributor.authorNeedham, Karina
melbourne.contributor.authorShepherd, Robert
melbourne.contributor.authorMINTER, RICKI
dc.identifier.eissn1744-7682
melbourne.fieldofresearch320907 Sensory systems
melbourne.seocode200199 Clinical health not elsewhere classified
melbourne.accessrightsAccess this item via the Open Access location


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