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dc.contributor.authorDean, B
dc.date.available2014-05-22T07:26:51Z
dc.date.issued2011-08-01
dc.identifierpii: S1461145710001410
dc.identifier.citationDean, B. (2011). Understanding the role of inflammatory-related pathways in the pathophysiology and treatment of psychiatric disorders: evidence from human peripheral studies and CNS studies. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NEUROPSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY, 14 (7), pp.997-1012. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1461145710001410.
dc.identifier.issn1461-1457
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/32913
dc.description© 2010 CINP. Online edition of the journal is available at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=PNP
dc.description.abstractMany lines of evidence now support the hypothesis that inflammation-related pathways are involved in the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders. Much of the data underpinning this hypothesis has come from the study of inflammation-related proteins in blood of individuals with mood disorders and schizophrenia. Significantly, recent data have emerged to suggest that changes in inflammation-related pathways are present in the CNS of subjects with psychiatric disorders. It is therefore timely to overview how such data, plus data on the role of inflammation-related proteins in CNS function, is contributing to understanding the pathophysiology of mood disorders and schizophrenia. In addition, it has been suggested that antidepressants, mood stabilizers and antipsychotic drugs act on inflammation-related pathways and therefore measuring levels of inflammation-related proteins in blood may be useful in monitoring treatment responsiveness. Despite these important neuropsychopharmacological discoveries, there is no clear understanding as to how inflammatory-related pathways can precipitate the onset of psychiatric symptoms. This review will focus on data suggesting that acute-reactive proteins and cytokines are affected by the pathophysiology of mood disorders and schizophrenia, that levels of blood inflammation-related proteins before and after treatment might be useful in the diagnosis of psychiatric disorders or measuring responsiveness to drug treatment. Finally, it will be postulated how changes in these proteins affect CNS function to cause psychiatric disorders.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherOXFORD UNIV PRESS
dc.subjectbipolar disorder
dc.subjectcytokines
dc.subjectinflammation
dc.subjectmajor depressive disorder
dc.subjectschizophrenia
dc.titleUnderstanding the role of inflammatory-related pathways in the pathophysiology and treatment of psychiatric disorders: evidence from human peripheral studies and CNS studies
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S1461145710001410
melbourne.peerreviewPeer Reviewed
melbourne.affiliationThe University of Melbourne
melbourne.affiliation.departmentDept. of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry & Health Sciences
melbourne.publication.statusPublished
melbourne.source.titleINTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NEUROPSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY
melbourne.source.volume14
melbourne.source.issue7
melbourne.source.pages997-1012
melbourne.publicationid162348
dc.description.doi10.1017/S1461145710001410
melbourne.elementsid334125
melbourne.contributor.authorDean, Brian
dc.identifier.eissn1469-5111
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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