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dc.contributor.authorDrews, B
dc.contributor.authorRoellig, K
dc.contributor.authorMenzies, BR
dc.contributor.authorShaw, G
dc.contributor.authorBuentjen, I
dc.contributor.authorHerbert, CA
dc.contributor.authorHildebrandt, TB
dc.contributor.authorRenfree, MB
dc.date.available2014-05-22T08:22:33Z
dc.date.available2013-02-27
dc.date.available2013-02-27
dc.date.available2013-02-27
dc.date.available2013-02-27
dc.date.available2013-02-27
dc.date.available2013-02-27
dc.date.available2013-02-27
dc.date.available2013-02-27
dc.date.available2013-02-27
dc.date.issued2013-03-15
dc.identifierpii: srep01458
dc.identifier.citationDrews, B., Roellig, K., Menzies, B. R., Shaw, G., Buentjen, I., Herbert, C. A., Hildebrandt, T. B. & Renfree, M. B. (2013). Ultrasonography of wallaby prenatal development shows that the climb to the pouch begins in utero. SCIENTIFIC REPORTS, 3 (1), https://doi.org/10.1038/srep01458.
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/33216
dc.descriptionC1 - Journal Articles Refereed
dc.description.abstractMarsupials have a functional placenta for a shorter period of time compared to that of eutherian species, and their altricial young reach the teats without any help from the mother. We have monitored the short intrauterine development of one marsupial, the tammar wallaby, with high-resolution ultrasound from reactivation of the 100-cell diapausing blastocyst to birth. The expanding blastocyst could be visualized when it had reached a diameter of 1.5 mm. From at least halfway through pregnancy, there are strong undulating movements of the endometrium that massage the expanding vesicle against the highly secretory endometrial surface. These unique movements possibly enhance exchange of uterine secretions and gases between the mother and embryo. There was a constant rate of development measured ultrasonographically from mid-gestation, regardless of when the blastocyst reactivated. Interestingly climbing movements by the fetus began in utero about 3 days before birth, mimicking those required to climb to the pouch.
dc.formatapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherNATURE PUBLISHING GROUP
dc.subjectVertebrate Biology; Evolution of Developmental Systems; Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
dc.titleUltrasonography of wallaby prenatal development shows that the climb to the pouch begins in utero
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/srep01458
melbourne.peerreviewPeer Reviewed
melbourne.affiliationThe University of Melbourne
melbourne.affiliation.departmentZoology
melbourne.source.titleSCIENTIFIC REPORTS
melbourne.source.volume3
melbourne.source.issue1
dc.research.codefor060809
dc.research.codefor060305
dc.research.codeseo2008970106
dc.rights.licenseCC BY-NC-ND
melbourne.publicationid196483
melbourne.elementsid506744
melbourne.openaccess.pmchttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3597997
melbourne.contributor.authorMenzies, Brandon
melbourne.contributor.authorRenfree, Marilyn
melbourne.contributor.authorShaw, Geoffrey
dc.identifier.eissn2045-2322
melbourne.conference.locationEngland
pubs.acceptance.date2013-02-27
melbourne.accessrightsAccess this item via the Open Access location


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