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dc.contributor.authorVu, H. T. V.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKeeffe, J. E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMcCarty, C. A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, H. R.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-22T08:58:38Z
dc.date.available2014-05-22T08:58:38Z
dc.date.issued2005-03en_US
dc.date.submitted2006-10-05en_US
dc.identifier.citationVu, H. T. V., Keeffe, J. E., McCarty, C. A. & Taylor, H. R. (2005). Impact of unilateral and bilateral vision loss on quality of life. British Journal of Ophthalmology, 89(no.3), 360-363.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/33409
dc.descriptionThis is a publisher’s version of an article published in British Journal of Opthalmology 2005 published by BMJ Publishing. http://bjo.bmj.com/en_US
dc.description.abstractAim: To investigate whether unilateral vision loss reduced any aspects of quality of life in comparison with normal vision and to compare its impact with that of bilateral vision loss. Methods: This study used cluster stratified random sample of 3271 urban participants recruited between 1992 and 1994 for the Melbourne Visual Impairment Project. All predictors and outcomes were from the 5 year follow up examinations conducted in 1997–9. Results: There were 2530 participants who attended the follow up survey and had measurement of presenting visual acuity. Both unilateral and bilateral vision loss were significantly associated with increased odds of having problems in visual functions including reading the telephone book, newspaper, watching television, and seeing faces. Non-correctable by refraction unilateral vision loss increased the odds of falling when away from home (OR = 2.86, 95% CI 1.16 to 7.08), getting help with chores (OR = 3.09, 95% CI 1.40 to 6.83), and becoming dependent (getting help with meals and chores) (OR = 7.50, 95% CI 1.97 to 28.6). Non-correctable bilateral visual loss was associated with many activities of daily living except falling. Conclusions: Non-correctable unilateral vision loss was associated with issues of safety and independent living while non-correctable bilateral vision loss was associated with nursing home placement, emotional wellbeing, use of community services, and activities of daily living. Correctable or treatable vision loss should be detected and attended to.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBMJ Publishing Groupen_US
dc.subjectCERAen_US
dc.subjectophthalmologyen_US
dc.subjectCentre for Eye Research Australiaen_US
dc.subjecteye researchen_US
dc.subjectvisionen_US
dc.subjectvisual healthen_US
dc.titleImpact of unilateral and bilateral vision loss on quality of lifeen_US
dc.typeJournal (Paginated)en_US
melbourne.peerreviewPeer Revieweden_US
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMedicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences: Centre for Eye Research Australiaen_US
melbourne.affiliation.departmentSchool of Medicine: Ophthalmologyen_US
melbourne.publication.statusPublisheden_US
melbourne.source.titleBritish Journal of Ophthalmologyen_US
melbourne.source.month03en_US
melbourne.source.volume89en_US
melbourne.source.issue3en_US
melbourne.source.pages360-363en_US
melbourne.source.pages360-363en_US
melbourne.elementsidNA
melbourne.contributor.authorVU, HIEN
melbourne.contributor.authorKeeffe, Jill
melbourne.contributor.authorTaylor, Hugh
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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