Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorRIZZI, ANDREAen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-22T09:11:55Z
dc.date.available2014-05-22T09:11:55Z
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.date.submitted2006-12-14en_US
dc.identifier.citationRizzi, A. (2005). Matilda/Matelda: filling in the map of fourteenth-century historical writing about Matilda, Countess of Canossa (1046-1115). In M. Baker, F. Coassin & D. Glenn (Eds.), Dante at Flinders (pp. 102-115). Adelaide, S.A.: Lythrum Press.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/33480
dc.descriptionThis is a pre-print of a chapter in Dante at Flinders, published by Lythrum Press. This version is reproduced with the permission of Lythrum Press. http://www.lythrumpress.com.auen_US
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this paper is twofold. First, I explore the historical perception and representation of the life of Matilda during Dante’s time. In particular, I will discuss the works of two early fourteenth century historians, Riccobaldo of Ferrara (c. 1245-1318?) and the Dominican friar Pipino of Bologna (c. 1270-c. 1328). The works of Riccobaldo and Pipino show that early fourteenth century historians had access to a number of sources on the life of Matilda, including arguably the most detailed, albeit propagandistic, narrative on the life of Matilda, the poem called Librum de Principibus Canusinis (also known as Vita Mathildis, completed in 1115, just after Matilda’s death) by Donizo, who was abbot of the Benedictine Monastery of Sant’Apollonio in Canossa (1070-circa 1136). Contrary to Capitani’s assertion, Dante could have known more about Matilda than Villani, Cino da Pistoia and the early commentators of the Commedia knew, for there is evidence that Riccobaldo’s Historie contained an extensive account of the Countess Matilda’s deeds. Unfortunately, the section of Riccobaldo’s Historie covering world history between the years 375-1308 is lost. Any present knowledge we might have of what this portion contained is based upon Pipino’s and Matteo Maria Boiardo’s use of it. The second aim is to demonstrate how at least one of the many rewritings of Donizo’s poem was available within Dante’s cultural environment. This will be discussed by establishing a link between Riccobaldo, Pipino and an early fourteenth century adaptation of the Vita Mathildis. This adaptation, although based on Donizo’s poem, is a narrative that relies also to some extent upon sources other than Donizo’s to dispel the mystery surrounding the more private life of the Countess, including speculation about her marriages and concerning the birth of a child to her. As we shall see, evidence shows that the now lost portion of Riccobaldo’s major work, the Historie, could in fact contain much of what Pipino discussed on Matilda in his Chronicon, which leads to the possibility that Dante himself was at least aware of such assessments of the life of the Countess.en_US
dc.formatapplication/pdfen_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherLythrum Pressen_US
dc.subjectBoiardoen_US
dc.subjectRiccobaldoen_US
dc.subjectDanteen_US
dc.subjecttranslationen_US
dc.subjectMatildaen_US
dc.subjectMateldaen_US
dc.subjectPipinoen_US
dc.subjectCanossaen_US
dc.subjectHistoria Imperialeen_US
dc.titleMatilda/Matelda: filling in the map of fourteenth-century historical writing about Matilda, Countess of Canossa (1046-1115)en_US
dc.typeBook Chapteren_US
melbourne.peerreviewPeer Revieweden_US
melbourne.affiliationUniversity of Melbourneen_US
melbourne.affiliation.departmentArts: Department of French and Italian Studiesen_US
melbourne.publication.statusPublisheden_US
melbourne.source.titleDante at Flindersen_US
melbourne.source.titleProceedings, Flinders Dante Conferences 2002 & 2004en_US
melbourne.source.pages102-115en_US
melbourne.source.locationconferenceAdelaideen_US
dc.description.sourcedate1-3 October 2004en_US
melbourne.elementsidNA
melbourne.contributor.authorRizzi, Andrea
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record