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dc.contributor.authorHUMPHREYS, CATHYen_US
dc.contributor.authorThiara, Ravi K.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-22T09:19:54Z
dc.date.available2014-05-22T09:19:54Z
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.date.submitted2007-11-05en_US
dc.identifier.citationHumphreys, C., & Thiara, R. K. (2003). Neither justice nor protection: women’s experiences of post-separation violence. Journal of Social Welfare and Family Law, 25(3), 195-214.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/33523
dc.description© 2003 Taylor & Francis. Publisher PDF version is restricted access in accordance with the Taylor & Francis policy.en_US
dc.description.abstractPost-separation violence is an issue for a significant group of domestic violence survivors (and their children) leaving abusive relationships. This article draws on research conducted with women who have experienced post-separation violence. It explores definitions and the nature of post-separation violence experienced by women and often their children. More than three-quarters (76 per cent) of the 161 separated women in the study initially suffered further abuse and harassment from their former partners. Much of the violence ceased after the first 6–12 months, often due to the woman moving. However, more than one-third (36 per cent) of the women suffered continued post-separation violence. Against this background, women’s experiences of legal routes to protection are examined and the effectiveness of the law in tackling the issue of post-separation violence explored. In so doing, post-separation violence is used to exemplify and further explore Smart’s contention that there are many contradictions and complexities in the practice of the law, particularly as it relates to the on-going oppression of women (1995: 145). For a group of women, violence escalated over time. These women and their children were seriously at risk of harm. Poor law enforcement, the ineffectiveness of civil protection orders and inadequate prosecution and sanctions left these women (and their children) vulnerable to further assaults and harassment. Child contact was a point of vulnerability for on-going post-separation violence and abuse. The implications for future policy and practice are highlighted.en_US
dc.formatapplication/pdfen_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherRoutledgeen_US
dc.subjectpost-separation violenceen_US
dc.subjectstalkingen_US
dc.subjectchild contacten_US
dc.subjectdomestic violenceen_US
dc.subjectprotection ordersen_US
dc.titleNeither justice nor protection: women’s experiences of post-separation violenceen_US
dc.typeJournal (Paginated)en_US
melbourne.peerreviewPeer Revieweden_US
melbourne.affiliationThe University of Melbourneen_US
melbourne.affiliation.departmentArts: School of Social Worken_US
melbourne.publication.statusPublisheden_US
melbourne.source.titleJournal of Social Welfare and Family Lawen_US
melbourne.source.volume25en_US
melbourne.source.issue3en_US
melbourne.source.pages195-214en_US
melbourne.elementsidNA
melbourne.contributor.authorHumphreys, Cathy
melbourne.accessrightsThis item is currently not available from this repository


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