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dc.contributor.authorPENNA, IANen_US
dc.contributor.otherLunney, D.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-22T09:31:29Z
dc.date.available2014-05-22T09:31:29Z
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.date.submitted2008-04-04en_US
dc.identifier.citationPenna, I. (2004). The Eden woodchip scheme and its implications for forest fauna: a political ecology perspective. In D. Lunney (Ed.), Conservation of Australia's Forest Fauna, (2nd ed.), (pp. 63-80). Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/33584
dc.descriptionIan Penna is an Honorary Research Fellow with the School of Social and Environmental Enquiry of the University of Melbourne and can be contacted by e-mail on <i.penna@unimelb.edu.au>en_US
dc.description.abstractA ‘political ecology’ perspective was used to examine the implications of the export woodchip scheme located near Eden in south east New South Wales (NSW) for the region’s public forests and their fauna. The modern paper industry’s political economy emphasises the importance of a large supply of wood fibre of suitable price and quality for competitive papermaking. The evolution of the Japanese paper industry and the exploitative history of forests in south east NSW interacted to create the opportunity to establish such a supply in Australia for the Japanese papermaker Daishowa Paper Manufacturing Co from 1970. The ‘Harris-Daishowa’ export woodchip scheme at Eden was based on the guaranteed supply of large volumes of pulpwood from the region’s public native forests. Meeting this supply entailed restructuring available forests through clearfell logging over about 40 years. Featuresof the regime used to manage these forests and supply pulpwood were examined within this context, and the consequences of woodchipping for fauna protection are discussed. Fauna populations were being restructured by this regime, which ‘squeezed’ them between priorities for wood production and fire management. In particular, forest-dependent fauna, such as gliders, some possums and koalas, have been detrimentally impacted. Substantial changes to public forest management in south east NSW took almost 30 years to achieve. However, while export woodchipping continues, the ‘political ecology’ of local forest fauna will be influenced by international pulp and paper markets.en_US
dc.formatapplication/pdfen_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherRoyal Zoological Society of New South Walesen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://www.rzsnsw.org.au/ForestFauna2.htmen_US
dc.subjectFaunaen_US
dc.subjectforestryen_US
dc.subjectAustraliaen_US
dc.subjectJapanen_US
dc.subjectEdenen_US
dc.subjectwoodchipen_US
dc.subjectpaperen_US
dc.subjectindustryen_US
dc.subjectpolitical ecologyen_US
dc.titleThe Eden woodchip scheme and its implications for forest fauna: a political ecology perspectiveen_US
dc.typeBook Chapteren_US
melbourne.peerreviewPeer Revieweden_US
melbourne.affiliation.departmentArts: Department of Geography and Environmental Studiesen_US
melbourne.publication.statusPublisheden_US
melbourne.source.titleConservation of Australia's Forest Fauna, (2nd edition)en_US
melbourne.source.pages63-80en_US
melbourne.elementsidNA
melbourne.contributor.authorPENNA, IAN
melbourne.accessrightsThis item is currently not available from this repository


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