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dc.contributor.authorKeogh, Louise A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSouthey, Melissa C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMaskiell, Judien_US
dc.contributor.authorYoung, Mary-Anneen_US
dc.contributor.authorGaff, Clara L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKirk, Judyen_US
dc.contributor.authorTucker, Katherine M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRosenthal, Doreenen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcCredie, Margaret R. E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGiles, Graham G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHopper, John L.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-22T09:32:27Z
dc.date.available2014-05-22T09:32:27Z
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.date.submitted2008-05-02en_US
dc.identifier.citationKeogh, L. A., Southey, M. C., Maskiell, J., Young, M., Gaff, C. L., Kirk, J., Tucker, K. M., Rosenthal, D., McCredie, M. R. E., Giles, G. G., & Hopper, J. L. (2004). Uptake of offer to receive genetic information about BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in an Australian population-based study. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, 13(12), 2258-2263.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/33589
dc.descriptionThis is a publisher's version of an article published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention 2004 published by American Association for Cancer Research. This version is reproduced with permission from AACR. http://cebp.aacrjournals.org/en_US
dc.description.abstractResearch on the utilization of genetic testing services for mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 has focused on women with a strong family history of breast and ovarian cancer. We conducted a population-based case-control-family study of Australian women diagnosed with invasive breast cancer before age 40 years, unselected for family history, and tested for germ line mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2. Case subjects found to carry a deleterious mutation and their relatives who had given a research blood sample were informed by mail that the study had identified “genetic information” and were offered the opportunity to learn more. Those interested were referred to a government-funded family cancer clinic. Of 94 subjects who received the letter, 3 (3%) did not respond and 38 (40%) declined to learn their result (16 declined the referral, 10 accepted but did not attend a clinic, and 12 attended a clinic but declined testing), and 12 (13%) remain “on hold”. The remaining 41 (44%) chose to learn their result (3 of whom already knew their mutation status). There was no evidence that the decision to learn of mutation status depended on age, gender, family history, or having been diagnosed with breast cancer. Of 19 families with more than one participant, in 11 (58%) there was discordance between relatives in receiving genetic results.en_US
dc.formatapplication/pdfen_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Association for Cancer Researchen_US
dc.subjectgenetic testingen_US
dc.subjectuptakeen_US
dc.subjectbreast canceren_US
dc.subjectBRCA1en_US
dc.subjectBRCA2en_US
dc.titleUptake of offer to receive genetic information about BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in an Australian population-based studyen_US
dc.typeJournal (Paginated)en_US
melbourne.peerreviewPeer Revieweden_US
melbourne.affiliationThe University of Melbourneen_US
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMedicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences: Key Centre for Women's Health in Societyen_US
melbourne.publication.statusPublisheden_US
melbourne.source.titleCancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Preventionen_US
melbourne.source.month12en_US
melbourne.source.volume13en_US
melbourne.source.issue12en_US
melbourne.source.pages2258-2263en_US
melbourne.elementsidNA
melbourne.contributor.authorGaff, Clara
melbourne.contributor.authorGiles, Graham
melbourne.contributor.authorHopper, John
melbourne.contributor.authorKeogh, Louise
melbourne.contributor.authorMASKIELL, Judi
melbourne.contributor.authorRosenthal, Doreen
melbourne.contributor.authorSouthey, Melissa
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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