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dc.contributor.authorROGERS, MARKen_US
dc.contributor.authorTSENG, YI-PINGen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-22T09:41:00Z
dc.date.available2014-05-22T09:41:00Z
dc.date.issued2000-06en_US
dc.date.submitted2002-11-11en_US
dc.identifier.citationRogers, Mark and Tseng, Yi-Ping (2000) Analysing Firm-Level Labour Productivity Using Survey Data.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/33633
dc.descriptionThis paper is the result of work being undertaken as part of a collaborative research program entitled 'The Performance of Australian Enterprises: Innovation, Productivity and Profitability'. The project is generously supported by the Australia Research Council and the following collaborative partners: Australian Tax Office, Commonwealth Office of Small Business, IBIS Business Information Pty Ltd, Productivity Commission, and Victorian Department of State Development. The views expressed in this paper represent those of the authors and not necessarily the views of the collaborative partneen_US
dc.description.abstractThis paper investigates the determinants of firm-level labour productivity in the manufacturing sector using GAPS data. These data are from a stratified survey, where the strata are based on industry and firm size. The paper focuses on whether weights should be applied in the regression analysis. Augmented Cobb-Douglas production functions are estimated, where a set of dummies are used as proxies for firm-level knowledge stocks. The regression results show that there are significant differences between the parameters estimated by weighted least squares (WLS) and OLS, particularly for the variables union density and training expenditure. These differences can be caused by parameter heterogeneity (across strata); in theoretical terms this means that applying the same production function across all firms is not appropriate. Given this parameter heterogeneity, both the OLS and WLS methods do not estimate parameters of interest. Instead, there is a requirement to estimate sub-sample regressions. These are presented in the second part of the empirical results.en_US
dc.formatapplication/pdfen_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://www.ecom.unimelb.edu.au/iaesrwww/wp/wp2000n10.pdfen_US
dc.subjectlabour productivityen_US
dc.subjectweightsen_US
dc.subjectsurvey.en_US
dc.titleAnalysing Firm-Level Labour Productivity Using Survey Dataen_US
dc.typePreprinten_US
melbourne.peerreviewNon Peer Revieweden_US
melbourne.affiliation.departmentEconomics and Commerce: Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Researchen_US
melbourne.source.month06en_US
melbourne.elementsidNA
melbourne.contributor.authorROGERS, MARK
melbourne.contributor.authorTseng, Yi-Ping
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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