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dc.contributor.authorTHOMPSON, JANNAen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-22T09:55:53Z
dc.date.available2014-05-22T09:55:53Z
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.date.submitted2002-11-28en_US
dc.identifier.citationThompson, Janna (2002) Is there such a thing as a rogue state?.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/33711
dc.descriptionCAPPE WP no. 2002/8en_US
dc.description.abstractMy main concern in this paper is not the issue of whether the states usually identified as 'rogue' – North Korea, Iraq, and Iran, for example – deserve to be so classified, or whether the term can be plausibly applied to the United States or even Australia. I want to concentrate on the notion of rogue or outlaw state itself – what meaning it has, what it is supposed to imply; whether its use can ever be justified, andhow it is supposed to relate to ideas about just war and international justice that have informed philosophical thinking about relations between stateen_US
dc.formatapplication/pdfen_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://www.philosophy.unimelb.edu.au/cappe/working_papers/Thompson1.pdfen_US
dc.subjectrogue stateen_US
dc.subjectoutlaw stateen_US
dc.subjectviolations of human rightsen_US
dc.subjectinternational lawsen_US
dc.subjectjust war traditionen_US
dc.subjectinternational societyen_US
dc.titleIs there such a thing as a rogue state?en_US
dc.typePreprinten_US
melbourne.peerreviewNon Peer Revieweden_US
melbourne.affiliation.departmentArts: Department of Philosophyen_US
melbourne.elementsidNA
melbourne.contributor.authorTHOMPSON, JANNA
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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