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dc.contributor.authorWILKINS, ROGERen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-22T10:12:31Z
dc.date.available2014-05-22T10:12:31Z
dc.date.issued2004-05en_US
dc.date.submitted2004-11-03en_US
dc.identifier.citationWilkins, Roger (2004) Do Longer Working Hours Lead to More Workplace Injuries? Evidence from Australian Industry-Level Panel Data.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/33798
dc.description.abstractUsing Australian industry-level data on weekly hours of work and frequency of new workers' compensation claims for work-related accidents over the 1990s, the relationship between working time and work-related injuries is examined. Results using panel data techniques suggest there is no relationship between working time of full-time workers and workplace safety performance. This finding is in contrast to cross-sectional evidence presented by previous researchers showing significant effects of working time on safety performance. Evidence is found in this study, however, that increased working time of part-time employed persons is associated with a greater rate of workplace injuries.en_US
dc.formatapplication/pdfen_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://www.ecom.unimelb.edu.au/iaesrwww/wp/wp2004n07.pdfen_US
dc.subjectworking hoursen_US
dc.subjectworkplace injuriesen_US
dc.titleDo Longer Working Hours Lead to More Workplace Injuries? Evidence from Australian Industry-Level Panel Dataen_US
dc.typePreprinten_US
melbourne.peerreviewNon Peer Revieweden_US
melbourne.affiliation.departmentEconomics and Commerce: Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Researchen_US
melbourne.source.month05en_US
melbourne.elementsidNA
melbourne.contributor.authorWilkins, Roger
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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