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dc.contributor.authorCHEN, PETER
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-22T10:14:47Z
dc.date.available2014-05-22T10:14:47Z
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.date.submitted2004-12-15en_US
dc.identifier.citationChen, P. (2004). e-lection 2004? New media and the campaign. In, Proceedings, Australian Election Workshop, ANU 2004, Canberra, Australia.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/33810
dc.descriptionDraft of latter chapter; contains information likely to be cut from the final print versionen_US
dc.description.abstractThis paper explores the use of new media technologies, such as the Internet, in the Australian federal election campaign of 2004. With indications of a closely-contested campaign dominating media coverage in the lead up to October 9, normal assumptions of campaign strategies would call for the use of the full range of campaigning techniques to pry open pockets of support in key marginal seats. Internationally, new media technologies have become increasingly important in political campaigning, both as a tool for direct communication between partisans and electors, and as a particularly powerful method of networking together people, money, and issues. Based on research conducted on parties, candidates, and non-party activists, this paper argues that the use of new technologies in the Australian electoral environment remains limited and, in some aspects, has declined from the previous electoral cycle. This can be attributed to a number of factors: fundamental difficulties in aligning new communications channels to Australia's political geography, low perceptions of the efficacy of new technologies in shifting electors' voting intentions, and the failure by organised political parties to systematically resource and strategise new media technologies within their conventional communications and campaigning strategies. Overall, while a number of interesting campaigning innovations were observed and individual candidates had a greater online presence in this electoral cycle, innovation in the use of new technologies for political purposes has remained relatively low compared with comparative jurisdictions.en_US
dc.formatapplication/pdfen_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.subjectInterneten_US
dc.subjectnew mediaen_US
dc.subjectelectionsen_US
dc.subjectcampaigningen_US
dc.subjectcivil societyen_US
dc.subjectmediaen_US
dc.subjectblogsen_US
dc.subjectcandidatesen_US
dc.subjectpoliticsen_US
dc.subjectAustraliaen_US
dc.subjectfederalismen_US
dc.subjectelectionen_US
dc.titlee-lection 2004? New media and the campaignen_US
dc.typeConference Paperen_US
melbourne.peerreviewNon Peer Revieweden_US
melbourne.affiliation.departmentArts: Centre for Public Policyen_US
melbourne.publication.statusUnpublisheden_US
melbourne.source.titleProceedings, Australian Election Workshop, ANU 2004en_US
melbourne.source.locationconferenceCanberra, Australiaen_US
dc.description.sourcedate3-4 December 2004en_US
melbourne.elementsidNA
melbourne.contributor.authorCHEN, PETER
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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