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dc.contributor.authorCOLLIER, P.
dc.contributor.authorLeahy, F.
dc.contributor.authorWILLIAMSON, IAN
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-22T10:31:03Z
dc.date.available2014-05-22T10:31:03Z
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.date.submitted2006-10-25en_US
dc.identifier.citationCollier, P. A., Leahy, F. J., & Williamson, I. P. (2001). Defining a marine cadastre for Australia. In, Proceedings, 42nd Australian Surveyors Congress, Brisbane, Australia.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/33895
dc.description.abstractAs the world's largest island, Australia has a coastline length of approximately 36,700 km. The nation's relative isolation from its neighbours enables it to claim one of the largest maritime jurisdictions in the world. The ocean territory to which Australia lays claim is about 1.5 times larger than the Australian land mass. Given the diversity and extent of Australia's ocean resources, there is an economic and social need to manage, explore and exploit the nation's ocean territories in a way that will maximise benefit, while at the same time protecting the ocean environment. An essential requirement for the consistent and effective management of the oceans is reliable, comprehensive and accurate spatial information. This introduces the complex issue of defining and quantifying the spatial and temporal interaction of a vast array of rights and responsibilities. Not only are our oceans subject to the interests of a diverse group of individuals and organisations, they are also governed by a complex web of government legislation. International treaties such as the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea(UNCLOS) also need to be considered. Many pieces of legislation contain geographical definitions for areas of jurisdiction. Understanding and managing the relationship and interaction between overlapping and sometimes competing rights is a complex problem. The objective behind the development of a marine cadastre is to provide a comprehensive spatial data infrastructure whereby rights, restrictions and responsibilities in the marine environment can be assessed, administered and managed. This paper describes a multi-faceted, collaborative project between the Department of Geomatics, the Australian Surveying and Land Information Group, the Queensland Department of Natural Resources and Mines, and Land Victoria to define the issues relevant to the development of a marine cadastre for Australia.en_US
dc.formatapplication/pdfen_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://www.geom.unimelb.edu.au/research/SDI_research/en_US
dc.subjectmarine cadastreen_US
dc.subjectmaritime boundariesen_US
dc.subjectspatial data infrastructureen_US
dc.subjectmarinerights and responsibilitieen_US
dc.titleDefining a marine cadastre for Australiaen_US
dc.typeConference Paperen_US
melbourne.peerreviewNon Peer Revieweden_US
melbourne.affiliation.departmentEngineering: Department of Geomaticsen_US
melbourne.publication.statusPublisheden_US
melbourne.source.titleProceedings, 42nd Australian Surveyors Congressen_US
melbourne.source.locationconferenceBrisbane, Australiaen_US
dc.description.sourcedate25-28 September 2001en_US
melbourne.elementsidNA
melbourne.contributor.authorCollier, Philip
melbourne.contributor.authorLeahy, Frank
melbourne.contributor.authorWilliamson, Ian
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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