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dc.contributor.authorWilliamson, Ian P.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-22T10:37:18Z
dc.date.available2014-05-22T10:37:18Z
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.date.submitted2006-11-02en_US
dc.identifier.citationWilliamson, I. P. (1997). Does the cadastral surveying profession have a future? In Proceedings, CONSAS '97, Durban, South Africa.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/33928
dc.descriptionThis is a paper from CONSAS 1997.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe surveying profession is currently facing the biggest challenge in its modern history. Rapid technological change, micro-economic reform, internationalisation, de-regulation of the professions, and the Internet are placing pressures on traditional professional operations and structures never previously experienced. Yet issues of environmental degradation, sustainable development, the management of our cities and economic rationalism are presenting opportunities and challenges to our profession never thought possible. Issues central to our profession such as cadastral reform and spatial data infrastructures are grabbing the attention of policy makers as they realise their importance in economic development, environmental management and social stability. Within the context of the Global Village, surveyors are increasingly working in the international market place. This is placing pressures on our education and training and the role that we see ourselves playing in society. The international push for cadastral reform, land and geographic information systems, improved urban management, environmental management and sustainable development is creating almost unlimited opportunities for our profession if we are prepared to grasp them; there are already other professions moving or ready to move into these traditional areas of the surveyor if we don't act. Can the surveying profession survive these changes and what does the future hold? This paper endeavours to seek answers to these questions by looking at the past, endeavouring to understand the present and trying to look into the future. The paper focuses on the Australian surveying profession while recognising that many of the issues discussed may be relevant to Southern Africa.en_US
dc.formattext/htmlen_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://www.csdila.unimelb.edu.au/publication/en_US
dc.titleDoes the cadastral surveying profession have a future?en_US
dc.typeConference Paperen_US
melbourne.peerreviewNon Peer Revieweden_US
melbourne.affiliation.departmentEngineering: Department of Geomaticsen_US
melbourne.publication.statusPublisheden_US
melbourne.source.titleProceedings, CONSAS '97en_US
melbourne.source.locationconferenceDurban, South Africaen_US
dc.description.sourcedate24-28 August 1997en_US
melbourne.elementsidNA
melbourne.contributor.authorWilliamson, Ian
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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