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dc.contributor.authorClapton, E. Ricken_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-23T09:30:40Z
dc.date.available2014-05-23T09:30:40Z
dc.date.issued2005-07en_US
dc.date.submitted2007-11-14en_US
dc.identifier.citationClapton, E. R. (2005). Intersections of conflict: policing and criminalising Melbourne’s traffic, 1890-1930, PhD thesis, Department of History, The University of Melbourne.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/39294
dc.descriptionDeposited with permission of the author. © 2005 E. Rick Claptonen_US
dc.description.abstractEvery single person on earth is a road-user; and, although an integral part of our society, the management of traffic is a low priority for most. Authorities constantly work to lessen the tension between the free-flow of traffic and traffic safety. Consequently, the management of traffic and its subsequent problems has consumed more time, money and resources than any other item on the public agenda. Between 1890 and 1930, urban road-traffic in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, as in other world cities, underwent a revolution as speeds increased 500%. The motor-vehicle exacerbated existing traffic problems with increased trips and vehicle numbers. Authorities separated the various road users with road demarcations, and placed upon the Victoria Police the responsibility of managing the heterogeneous and complex traffic mix. By the close of the 1920s, all the components—policing, case and statute law, and the physical infrastructure—of the contemporary traffic management system were firmly in place. Introducing motor-transport into a centuries old road network designed for much slower modes of transport, was similar to putting high speed trains, capable of hundreds of kilometres an hour, onto conventional tracks. The marriage of old systems and new technology required a plethora of controls, procedures and safeguards to attain an acceptable level of traffic deaths. Nonetheless, no matter how many modifications, it persisted as a hybrid system. It could not be made to work efficiently.en_US
dc.formatapplication/pdfen_US
dc.languageengen_US
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dc.subjecttraffic policeen_US
dc.subjectVictoriaen_US
dc.subjectMelbourneen_US
dc.subjecthistoryen_US
dc.titleIntersections of conflict: policing and criminalising Melbourne’s traffic, 1890-1930en_US
dc.typePhD thesisen_US
melbourne.peerreviewPeer Revieweden_US
melbourne.affiliationThe University of Melbourneen_US
melbourne.affiliation.departmentArts: Department of Historyen_US
melbourne.affiliation.departmentDepartment of Historyen_US
melbourne.publication.statusUnpublisheden_US
melbourne.source.month07en_US
melbourne.linkedresource.urlhttp://cat.lib.unimelb.edu.au/record=b2996987
melbourne.contributor.authorClapton, E. Ricken_US
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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