Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorOnibere, Mazino
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-17T02:16:34Z
dc.date.available2015-11-17T02:16:34Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/56595
dc.description© 2015 Mazino Onibere
dc.description.abstractThe modern organisation operates within a highly complex and sophisticated security threat landscape that exposes its information infrastructure to a range of security risks. This threat landscape includes advanced persistent threat (APT) – attackers are well-trained, organised, well-funded and capable of utilising a range of technologies to inflict damage over a prolonged period of time (Giura & Wang 2012; Ahmad 2010). Unsurprisingly, despite the existence of industry ‘best-practice’ security standards and unprecedented levels of investment in security infrastructure, the rate of incidents continues to escalate. The fundamental premise of this thesis is that the level of sophistication of threat requires organisations to develop novel security strategies that draw on creative and lateral thinking approaches. Such a security campaign requires the security manager to function as a ‘strategist’ by exercising ‘strategic thinking’. A review of security literature found little or no evidence that security managers are able or expected to function as strategists. Therefore this research project aims to identify the specific capabilities required by security managers to become effective strategists. A systematic literature review approach was adopted to determine 1) the existing role of the security manager from security literature, and 2) characteristics of a strategist from the management literature. Findings from a review of these literatures revealed 1) a strategic perspective of Information Security Management is missing, and 2) the management literature identifies a range of characteristics and qualities of a strategist. The latter was coded into the 5 dimensions of the strategist. These 5 dimensions are then discussed in the context of security managers and current strategic challenges facing security management. The result was a set of security capabilities required by security mangers to function as strategists. The thesis outlines implications for further research, including the need to expand the scope of literature review to warfare literature and the need to empirically test the 5 dimensions.en_US
dc.subjectinformation security strategyen_US
dc.subjectinformation security managementen_US
dc.subjectinformation security strategic challengesen_US
dc.subjectinformation security strategisten_US
dc.titleInformation security manager as a strategisten_US
dc.typeMasters Coursework thesisen_US
melbourne.affiliation.departmentInformation Systems
melbourne.affiliation.departmentComputing and Information Systems
melbourne.affiliation.facultyEngineering
melbourne.affiliation.facultyScience
melbourne.contributor.authorOnibere, Mazino
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record